Freshkills Park Blog

Brownfield remediation: a three-minute primer

A simple video called From Industrial Wasteland to Community Park, produced by the American Society of Landscape Architects, demonstrates how contaminated brownfield sites can be returned to productive and public use through site clearance and phytoremediation of contaminated soils.  A good introduction to the basic principles of a growing nationwide initiative to reclaim post-industrial sites.

(via The Dirt)

January 12, 2011 Posted by | FKP | , , , | Leave a comment

Sneak Peak: a spectacular day, in review

Sneak Peak was a huge success!  About 1800 people joined us at the Freshkills Park site on Sunday to make and fly kites, canoe in the creeks, walk the site with an expert, ride a pony, pet a goat, make a bag or a birdhouse, learn about composting and recycling and energy efficiency, receive a free bike helmet or fitting, enjoy the fun music, cool crafts and awesome food and generally celebrate the potential of this fascinating and amazing site.  The weather was incredible, and everyone was in good spirits.

To be honest, 1800 was a much bigger crowd than we anticipated for this event.  Never having held an event at the Freshkills Park site before meant that we had no baseline to gauge real participation.  We were astonished and energized by the volume of enthusiasm and interest in the park project, and we loved to see what a great time visitors were having.  We’re already looking forward to the next big event we can put on at the site.  More on that as it develops.

We’ve uploaded our own photos to flickr, but these definitely don’t get at everything there was to see.  There were so many people with cameras, and we would love to see—and to share—those photos!  Please share them with us, either by e-mail or by adding your photos to our flickr group pool for Sneak Peak.

October 5, 2010 Posted by | FKP | , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Garbage installation+panel on the LES, this Sunday

Landscapes with the Fall of Icarus is a two-week performance installation by artist Paul Lloyd Sargent for the the Mobile Literacy + Art Bus (MLAB), a collaborative project of art and architecture students at Syracuse University. From 2007 to 2008, the team converted a 1984 Recreational Vehicle into a mobile classroom, digital photo lab, gallery space, and community center for use by the Syracuse City School District and the greater Syracuse Community.  And now they’re on the road—at 29 Orchard Street in the Lower East Side, specifically, for the month of September.

Landscapes is a three-part project: a community trash clean-up and resulting ‘trashmap’ of the surrounding area; a series of extreme close-ups of neighborhood garbage taken by the artist and on display in the MLAB RV, and a panel event featuring artists, writers and activists talking about garbage issues in New York City and beyond.  Tthe panel will include Department of Sanitation Anthropologist-in-Residence Robin Nagle and blogger Leila Darabi of everydaytrash.com.

Panel discussion on the waste disposal chain
Sunday Sep 19th, 2010 | 2–4pm
29 Orchard Street, Manhattan

September 17, 2010 Posted by | FKP | , , , , | 2 Comments

Materials for the Arts featured on Thirteen

PBS Thirteen’s Sunday Arts program profiles Materials for the Arts (MFTA), the amazing and popular New York City materials reuse program. Founded in 1978 and still growing under the aegis of the City’s Department of Cultural Affairs, MFTA negotiates the transfer of hundreds of tons of materials annually from companies and individuals who no longer need them into the custody of artists and educators citywide who can make use of them.  They are the largest provider of free art supplies to the City’s public school system and also serve as a treasure trove for non-profit and public entities engaged in cultural, health and social programs.  We’ve been to their 25,000 sq. ft warehouse in Long Island City, and it’s truly incredible to consider their daily turnover in astonishingly valuable materials that would have otherwise entered the waste stream.

June 11, 2010 Posted by | FKP | , , , , | 1 Comment

Newtown Creek Visitor Center opens tomorrow

The NYC Department of Environmental Protection‘s Newtown Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant is already home of some of the most distinctive architecture in the City, the onion-dome digesters designed by Polshek Partnership Architects, as well as a lovely and serene Nature Walk designed by artist George Trakas.  Not bad for a sewage plant along one the country’s most polluted waterways!  And now the facility is adding another jewel to its crown: a Visitor Center, also designed by Polshek and featuring an indoor-outdoor fountain designed by artist Vito Acconci, is opening tomorrow.  This will be the first visitor center for a public infrastructure facility in New York City.  It’s exciting, and the exhibits should be very educational, given the scope of the operation—the plant treats more than 250 million gallons of wastewater daily.

After this weekend, the Center will be open Fridays and Saturdays from noon to 4pm.

Saturday, April 24 and Sunday, April 25, 2010
Noon-4pm
Newtown Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant
329 Greenpoint Avenue, Brooklyn

April 23, 2010 Posted by | FKP | , , , , | 1 Comment

Exhibit on Roosevelt Island garbage system opens

Garbage on Roosevelt Island—the 147-acre strip of land lying in the East River between Manhattan and Queens—is disposed of through a remarkable system of underground pneumatic tubes that was constructed in 1975.  The Island’s 14,000 residents empty their trash into a series of garbage chutes which are emptied into the pneumatic pipes several times daily, carrying it at 30 miles per hour to a transfer station at the end of the island. There it is compacted by the Department of Sanitation (DSNY), sealed into containers, and loaded on a truck for private export to a landfill outside the city.  This Automatic Vacuum Collections System (AVAC) collects and exports more than ten tons of waste daily.

A month-long exhibit on the AVAC, its history and its value as a model for future waste management operations opens today at Gallery RIVAA on the Island, with an opening reception this evening.  The show, called “Fast Trash,” has been curated by architect Juliette Spertus and the design firm Project Projects (which also designed the signage and visual identity of Freshkills Park).  “Fast Trash” includes explanatory diagrams, video interviews with DSNY engineers who maintain the system, and a selection of  drawings produced through a collaboration between the Center for Urban Pedagogy and students from the Child School, exploring what garbage collection might look like in a future without roads.  The show will also celebrate the 40th anniversary of the 1960 master plan developed for the Island by architects John Burgee and Philip Johnson.  A related panel discussion at the NYU Wagner Graduate School of Public Service called “Comparative Garbage Collection Strategy and Urban Planning” will take place on May 6th.

FAST TRASH: Roosevelt Island’s Pneumatic Tubes and the Future of Cities
April 22–May 23, 2010
Opening Reception: Thursday, April 22, 6–9pm
Gallery RIVAA, 527 Main Street, Roosevelt Island

April 22, 2010 Posted by | FKP | , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Pondering plastics, pollution and purpose

Information and reflection on plastic marine pollution continues to increase: as if the Great Pacific Garbage Patch weren’t cause for enough distress,the Sea Education Association (SEA) recently completed a two-decade study on the Atlantic Ocean and  reports that a large volume of discarded plastic also floats in the North Atlantic Gyre, trapped together by ocean currents and causing harm to fish and bird species inhabiting the area.

If you’re interested in learning more, Dr. Marcus Eriksen, director of research and education at California’s Algalita Marine Research Foundation, will be speaking at the American Museum of Natural History this Sunday, March 14th, about his research and about the impact of plastic marine pollution in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans.

Sunday, March 14, 12pm
Milstein Hall of Ocean Life, first floor
The American Museum of Natural History

Admission is free with museum admission


And for a more fable-like, existential take on the journey of plastic to this watery grave, filmmaker Ramin Bahrani’s short film Plastic Bag is now viewable online.  The film follows the lifetime of one plastic bag, from initial use to disposal and, eventually, out to sea.  At 18 minutes long, it’s not just a public service announcement but also an art film.  Fittingly, then, it features music by Sigur Ros‘s Kjartan Sveinsson and narration by German filmmaker Werner Herzog.

March 9, 2010 Posted by | FKP | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Zero Waste educational materials

The No Impact Project was started by Colin Beavan, also known as No Impact Man, to see if his family could live a zero-waste lifestyle for one year in New York City.  Through environmental education, the No Impact Project aims to empower others to reduce their impact on the environment (the No Impact Experiment, a “one-week carbon cleanse,” is featured in the video).  Beavan’s organization has developed The Environmental Education Curriculum for Middle and High School Teachers, a set of five lesson plans available for free online, focused on the following topics: Consumption, Energy, Food, Transportation and Water.

(via Treehugger)

January 15, 2010 Posted by | FKP | , , , , | 2 Comments

Sustainability in higher education

The New York Times documents a rise in university programs focused on sustainability, especially regarding the urban environment.  The Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education lists nine universities with master’s and doctoral programs in urban sustainability studies.  Most of these programs are interdisciplinary in nature, like the new graduate program at the City College of New York that will focus on sustainability in the urban environment, incorporating the approaches of architecture, engineering and science.  The growth of sustainability programs represents a shift from a focus within environmental studies on rural areas to an emphasis on the urban environment.

January 14, 2010 Posted by | FKP | , , , , | Leave a comment

Upcoming recycling and composting events

The post-holiday season can result in a lot of waste.  Groups around New York City are offering a host of upcoming recycling and composting events to ensure that not everything simply ends up in a landfill.

  • Parks all over the five boroughs will be participating in MulchFest this weekend, allowing you to bring your Christmas tree to a designated location to be chipped into mulch.  You can also take away free mulch being offered by the city.  10am-2pm, Saturday and Sunday.  The Department of Sanitation will also be offering curbside pickup of trees until January 15th.
  • The Lower East Side Ecology Center (LESEC) is offering several E-waste recycling points in Manhattan and Brooklyn, this weekend and next, where you can dispose of unwanted or broken electronic devices.
  • LESEC and the NYC Compost Project are hosting a number of worm composting workshops, for adults and for kids.  Registration in required and there is a fee of $5 per person.

January 8, 2010 Posted by | FKP | , , , , , | 1 Comment

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