Freshkills Park Blog

Pondering plastics, pollution and purpose

Information and reflection on plastic marine pollution continues to increase: as if the Great Pacific Garbage Patch weren’t cause for enough distress,the Sea Education Association (SEA) recently completed a two-decade study on the Atlantic Ocean and  reports that a large volume of discarded plastic also floats in the North Atlantic Gyre, trapped together by ocean currents and causing harm to fish and bird species inhabiting the area.

If you’re interested in learning more, Dr. Marcus Eriksen, director of research and education at California’s Algalita Marine Research Foundation, will be speaking at the American Museum of Natural History this Sunday, March 14th, about his research and about the impact of plastic marine pollution in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans.

Sunday, March 14, 12pm
Milstein Hall of Ocean Life, first floor
The American Museum of Natural History

Admission is free with museum admission


And for a more fable-like, existential take on the journey of plastic to this watery grave, filmmaker Ramin Bahrani’s short film Plastic Bag is now viewable online.  The film follows the lifetime of one plastic bag, from initial use to disposal and, eventually, out to sea.  At 18 minutes long, it’s not just a public service announcement but also an art film.  Fittingly, then, it features music by Sigur Ros‘s Kjartan Sveinsson and narration by German filmmaker Werner Herzog.

March 9, 2010 Posted by | FKP | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Outdoor sound sculpture to be ‘played’ by wind

Artist Luke Jerram is preparing an outdoor ‘acoustic pavilion’ called Aeolus, which will be built of hundreds of metal tubes acting as Aeolian harps.  Each tube will contain strings which will strike chords inside the structure as the wind passes over them, making the whole structure sing.  Visitors to the piece will be able to sit in the center of the structure, and the tubes will act as lighting filters, speckling the interior with shifting light.  Jerrem’s work includes a number of environmentally focused projects, including one that amplifies and orchestrates sounds made by plants.

Aeolus is being funded by the United Kingdom’s Engineering & Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) and hosted by the acoustic engineering departments at the University of Southampton (ISVR) and University of Salford.  The installation, which is currently in development, will be hosted by various temporary sites in the UK before being installed in a permanent location.

(via Green Diary)

March 9, 2010 Posted by | FKP | , , | 2 Comments